Accessing your ancestry: a personal experience

During the pandemic, Ancestry Library, a version of Ancestry.com, began providing at-home access to their rich database of genealogical information to our customers. It has proven to be quite popular.

With Ancestry Library, you can find all kinds of information on your ancestors, including certificates of marriage, birth and death. You can also find obituaries and other newspaper sources.

It's quite powerful and I personally found it useful in my own research into my biological family (I'm adopted). With this tool, I was able to sleuth my family background starting with some distant relatives I found through a DNA analysis I had done. This led to some false starts, but I eventually traced through family trees available in Ancestry Library to discover my relatives.

Speaking of the family trees, those are generated by Ancestry's active users who share information with one another and build detailed trees. Theses trees are amazing, tying together all those data points in the Ancestry database with photographs of family members. In my case, I was able to see my grandparents and great-grandparent's photos, which was the first time I'd laid eyes on a relative.

At-home access to Ancestry Library continues to be available, so get started this week!

We welcome your respectful and on-topic comments and questions in this limited public forum. To find out more, please see Appropriate Use When Posting Content. Community-contributed content represents the views of the user, not those of Palo Alto City Library